NEVER KNOWING

CHEVY STEVENS

Sara’s childhood had been less than ideal. Her father had always favoured his two biological daughters. When Sara decides to search for her birth parents she never could have imagined the immense ramifications. First her birth giver Julie won’t have anything to do with her. Then she finds out that Julie is the one woman who survived the serial killer known as the Camp Site Killer. How will this impact her own daughter and her relationship with her fiance.

Knowing is repetitive for the first three-quarters of the novel so needs a lot of skimming. But it has a great ending.

MY BEST BOOKS OF 2011

Annabel                                   Kathleen Winter

The Night Circus                    ERIN MORGENSTERN

The Cat’s Table                        MICHAEL ONDAATJE

The Help                                    KATHLEEN STOCKETT

The Lazarus Project              ALEKSANDAR HEMON

IT GETS BETTER: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living

Edited by  DAN SAVAGE, TERRY MILLER

MIRIAM TOEWES                Irma Voth

Help Me Jacques Cousteau            GIL ADAMSON

Alone In the Classrom                     ELIZABETH HAY

Love and War in His Homeland    Basharat Peer

We Had It So Good                             LINDA GRANT

The Tiger’s Wife                                  TEA OBREHT

DESERT FLOWER: The Extraordinary Journey of a Desert Nomad

WARIS DIRIE and Cathleen Miller

I SHALL NOT HATE: A Gaza Doctor’s Journey             DR. IZZELDIN ABUELAISH

WAR IS BORING: Bored Stiff, Scared to Death in the World’s Worst War Zones

DAVID AXE and MATT BORS

Hidden Wives                                      CLAIRE AVERY

OVERTHROW: America’s Century of Regime Change

STEPHEN KINZER

Wetlands                                               CHARLOTTE ROCHE

Sh*t My Dad Says                               JUSTIN HALPERN

The Crying Tree                                   MASEEM RAKHA

Room                                                     EMMA DONOGHUE

The Beauty of Humanity Movement      CAMILLA GIBB

THE UNCOUPLING

MEG WOLITZER

Wolitzer has crafted an amazing novel on the power of literature. When the new high school drama teacher chooses Lysistratra, the Greek comedy in which women decide to stop having sex with their men to end a war, a spell is created that spirals through the staff, the parental community, into the wider community and even into the student body. Women suddenly stop feeling desire for their mates. They end their conjugal obligations like the banging of a cell door. Dory and her husband Robby Lang, both teachers at the high school, seemed to have a perfect relationship but this changes when Dory is affected by the spell. The best part of the book is the ending, starting with the stage production of Lysistratra.

An excellent read.

 

For previous pages:

http://bevd.edublogs.org/

THE NIGHT STRANGERS

CHRIS BOHJALIAN

A deliciously well written mysterious thriller. Chip is a pilot who is forced to land his regional jet on Lake Champlain. He prays that he can create a miracle like the pilot who landed on the Hudson River with out a single death. He does not succeed; most of the passengers die. His wife Emily decides that the best thing for the couple and their twin ten year old daughters is to move to the calm and peace of northern New Hampshire. They purchase a Victorian house that has lots of rooms and back stair cases and hidden passages. There are even weapons secreted in unusual places. But most mysterious is the door in the basement that has been sealed shut with thirty-nine 6-inch-long bolts.

The neighbours are friendly but weird. All the women have names of herbs and plants. They all have green houses and they grow strange plants that they have found from around the world with which the make salves, tinctures and potions. Their baking is succulent but somewhat off at the same time.  And they are obsessed with the twin girls.

A must read. Also read Bohjalian’s Twin Sister Radio, which is fantastic.

 

I liked this cover better than the cover of the copy I read so I borrowed it.