THE RUINS OF US

KEIJA PARSSINEN

American born Rosalie is content living in Saudi Arabia with her powerful and wealthy Saudi husband Abdullah Baylani. They have two beautiful kids, Faisal who at sixteen resents what he sees as his family’s decadent ways, longs for purity and Allah and studies with a fundamentalist sheik. Miriam, their daughter, is younger and wants to change the country in ways that will bring greater freedom to women. One morning when out at a jewellery store, the owner asks if Rosalie liked her anniversary present of black onyx earrings. It is then she realizes that her husband has taken a second wife which is legal but almost never done in Saudi society. Rosalie’s world falls apart.

It was an interesting read to have this peek into Saudi and expat lifestyles.

BURNT MOUNTAIN

ANNE RIVERS SIDDONS

Burnt Mountain is a coming of age story in the southern US. Thayer’s wealthy grandmother, Grand, exiled her parents to a small town because her she didn’t trust her daughter-in-law to enter Atlanta’s aristocratic upper class society. Thayer grows up a tomboy in a home were she was expected to be most gentile. It turns out she was most like her Grand who eventually grooms Thayer to inherit her father’s rarified legacy. When Thayer returns from working at a summer camp pregnant, she is tricked by her mother into having an abortion. And the drama continues when she starts college. Not the best book but I found it engaging and humourous.

KISS OF THE FUR QUEEN

TOMSON HIGHWAY

What a wonderful novel. Definitely a must read. I couldn’t say it any better than this review that I borrowed from The Canadian Book Review.

Tomson Highway is one of Canada’s best known playwrites, most notably the author of The Rez Sisters and Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing, both of which are Dora and Chalmer’s Award winning plays. Published in 1998, Kiss of the Fur Queen is Highway’s first and only novel; containing many autobiographical points, this book takes on a lot of issues. In North American Native literature there has been a trend of authors either being too hard on their own culture or glossing over the harsher realities of Native life. Highway, a Cree from northern Manitoba, walks a fine line between these two extremes with his writing. This novel takes place over the course of around 35 years; looking at how Natives were treated in Catholic residential schools, sexuality, art, and family.

The story focuses on a pair of brothers, Jeremiah and Gabriel Okimasis, and their journey from birth to young adulthood; in each of the six parts of the book, a different stage of the brothers lives are narrated. As you start to read this it takes a few chapters to really get into the book and get used to the language. Canadian Native lit is often written with the same style as the oral narrative, which is an important piece of their culture; if you were to read a few pages out loud this will be very apparent. The dialog is as beautiful as would be expected from a playwrite of this caliber.

The topics and themes of this story are very serious subjects and are, at several points in the novel, very difficult to get through, mainly because of Highway’s vivid writing. The Okimasis brothers are representative of the Native community as a whole in the early fifties; they are being pulled away from their Cree culture and thrust into the world of Catholicism and the indoctrination that would come with attending a residential school. There are horrifying scenes of abuse and molestation as well as heartbreaking scenes of torment directed towards the only two Natives at this school. As the story progresses the focus turns to Gabriel’s sexuality. As he confronts his homosexuality, in a time when this was not overly accepted, he descends into promiscuity and prostitution with constant flashbacks of the abuse he suffered at the hands of the priests. This part of the novel is so beautifully written but so hard to endure. There is so much pain in Gabriel’s life and past that he really doesn’t stand a chance to live a so-called “normal” existence.

My one criticism of this book, and it is not exactly a flaw of the writing, likely more so a flaw with this reader, the details used when Highway is writing about dancing and music are so detailed, with so much technical terminology, it is sometimes difficult to understand what exactly is being said. Jeremiah and Gabriel, eventually become a world-class musician/playwrite and dancer respectively. These details though certainly give the story a level of depth and believability when looking at the brothers passion for their arts.

This is a very sad book; at points there seems to be very little hope for the characters, and even at the end of the novel, it could be argued there is still none. In a short review it is impossible to touch on everything this book looks at. This is the type of novel academics could spend years and countless articles looking at. A beautiful novel, a moving novel, and an eye opening novel, I thinkKiss of the Fur Queen will definitely be looked at as one of the great Native novels of its time along side Three Day Road and Green Grass, Running Water.