EXTRAORDINARY

extraDAVID GILMOUR

Sally has asked her much young half-brother to help her end her life. Sally has been severely disabled since she broke her neck tripping over a carpet at a party. “Everything had shut down,” she tells her brother. “From my neck downwards. It was like waking up in somebody else’s sleeping body. You want to move your arm, but your arm won’t obey.” Explaining her decision she says, “I’m not depressed, the world isn’t grey, I don’t want to punish people. It’s just that this has become less and less manageable. I don’t want to go into physical details, but you understand. And it’s only going to get worse.” She plans to drink alcohol and then take pills that her brother has procured for her that have  been with drawn from the market because of their severe reaction with alcohol. A sure plan. They spend the the evening and night talking and reminiscing; the novel is almost all conversation. Most of the story is Sally’s, we don’t even know her brother’s name.  Different from her 15 year younger brother, Sally was raised by her grandparents. She had two kids of her own, from a failed marriage, Kyle, who turns out to be a psychopathic liar and a thief and Chloe, who is a serious, albeit troubled, artiste. It becomes apparent to the reader that some kind of mental illness runs in the family.

Extraordinary is short novel and quick, interesting read.

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